Tag: hackers.mu

Africa Internet Summit 2018 – Hackathon – Day 2 & 3

Back to blogging after some days, I still recalled the moments in Dakar, Senegal for the Africa Internet Summit. By the time, so many days already elapsed, many have already blogged about the event and more pictures raining on the social media. Our camera, tripod and laptops were all ready. In case, you have missed Day 0 and Day 1, feel free to click on the links.

On day 2, myself with Logan and Serge made a brief introduction of the Network Time Protocol. Serge explained about the TCPDump and Wireshark tools that we can use to understand NTP traffic. We also made some demo about the NTP packets exchange between the client and the server. The algorithm behind was made clear, brief and concise as without which the hacking part would be difficult. Participants chose their projects for the hackathon. Some registered themselves for the Network Programmability track and the Intelligent Transportation Systems Projects. At the end of the day 2 we were already convinced about the hackathon would be a success. Myself, Logan and Charles decided to have a beer at a nearby restaurant.

Day 3 was the moment where everyone looked forward to hack into the code. The team spirit was here. Everyone was helping each other in their ‘parcours’. For the NTP hackathon, more and more participants start joining the team. Additional chairs and tables were needed. The best idea was to form into groups and this is where things change for the good. Patches start raining. Several tests were also carried out to confirm the code was running.

At the end of the hackathon, each group went to present their project and achievements. Their presentation slides can be viewed on the AIS wiki.

Some interesting links:

  • More information about the NTP hackathon is already uploaded on the AIS wiki.
  • The meeting statistics and report can be viewed here.
  • There is also a blog coverage by Charles from CISCO.
  • Dawit Bekele speech at the African Internet Summit 2019.
  • Another Interesting article by Kevin Chege from Internet Society.

On the last day of the hackathon, Logan, Charles and myself made a video on the hackathon.

More and more pictures:

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A big thank to the organisers and sponsors for doing a great job. Also congratulations to the participants for stepping ahead in the hackathon. Looking forward to see you soon in the growth and security of Internet in Africa.

Africa Internet Summit 2018 – Getting ready for the Hackathon – Day 1

On day 1, I woke up early in the morning and went outside for a morning walk. Everyone in Senegal says Bonjour to each other, irrespective of being a stranger. The people of Dakar seem very polite and relaxed in nature. Whilst walking on the coastal road of Novotel, I admired the beauty of several massive Baobab trees. 

Baobab tree coastal road of Novotel
Baobab tree coastal road of Novotel

Back at the hotel, the breakfast was delicious with lots of fruits and cakes accompanied with juice. By the time, breakfast was over, it was already 0800 AM. I took a Panoramic view from the back of Novotel.

Panorama picture coastal road of Novotel
Panorama picture coastal road of Novotel

I had to get ready as I needed to travel from Novotel hotel to Radisson Blu where the hackathon preparation was going on. I met with Serge-Parfait GOMA instructor at the Hackathon together with Loganaden Velvindron from Afrinic. On Day 1, there were about 15 participants who already registered themselves. We had to prepare for the Hackathon as it needed to be carried out both in English and French.

From Left to Right : Logan, Nitin and Serge

Preparing for the Hackathon demands lots of time and trying to cover the maximum: from the basics until when the code need to be hacked. The project chosen was the NTP client. I created both slides in English and French.

Whilst I was preparing for the slides, Serge was busy setting up the Pidgin channel. We also tested the livestream. I brought a tripod for my Iphone 7 as it’s so easy for live YouTube video broadcast. We also checked out the hackathon room and carried out several tests. We were happy to be assisted by the guys from ISOC who were always there to help. We reviewed the code anew and discussed a little about the RFCs and Internet Drafts for that specific hackathon.

Time for dinner where I met fellows from Afrinic such as Duksh Koonjoobeeharry from Atlassian User group of Mauritius and Afrinic, Tamon Mookoom from Afrinic – That guy is an IPv6 ninja, Charles Eckel from CISCO who was also leading the hackathon on the network programmability track. I also met other persons from the ISOC team and Nishal Goburdhan a FreeBSD evangelist who gave me a FreeBSD sticker.

Panorama view at the cocktail event
Panorama view at the cocktail event
 
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By the time, dinner was over, it was already late. I went to meet the ISOC and Afrinic guys who were still working hard to set up the hackathon room. I took a cab and headed directly to Novotel hotel.

In case you missed Day 0, do check the article here

Tunnelix.com is constantly retweeting the #AISdakar. It can be viewed here:

Africa Internet Summit 2018 – My first day in Dakar Senegal – Day 0

Dakar offers much to see and do, but my goal this trip lies elsewhere: facilitating the #AISdakar 2018 NTP – Network Time Protocol hackathon under the banner of hackers.mu which has been planned days back at Radisson blu hotel. Network Time Protocol (NTP) packets, as specified by RFC 5905 [RFC5905], carry a great deal of information about the state of the NTP daemon which transmitted them. In the case of mode 4 packets (responses sent from server to client), as well as in broadcast (mode 5) and symmetric peering modes (mode 1/2), most of this information is essential for accurate and reliable time synchronizaton. However, in mode 3 packets (requests sent from client to server), most of these fields serve no purpose. Server implementations never need to inspect them, and they can achieve nothing by doing so. Populating these fields with accurate information is harmful to privacy of clients because it allows a passive observer to fingerprint clients and track them as they move across networks.

The trip from Mauritius to Senegal was lengthy but at the same time, I got to discover parts of Africa: from South Africa to Kenya, hitting Ivory Coast before reaching Dakar, Senegal. During our transit in Johannesburg, Logan and I discussed several aspects of the AIS hackathon 2018 over two large pizzas and beers. One of the main goal is to maintain clear and precise billingual communication in English and French. Our next objective was to make sure that the required level should be reached for the hackathon.

I did not know that the plane will land at Ivory Coast before heading towards Dakar. Gazing out of the plane offered us unique breath taking and impressive views of infrastructures, panorama of the land and landscapes.

 

Disembarking at Dakar International Airport, I was received by the driver who works for a well reputed company – Prestige. Logan was received by an other company. Whilst travelling to the hotel, that guy was displaying curiosity and was inquisitive about computer repairs. I gave him some tips such as YouTube tutorials and some helpful links.

After landing, I headed directly to and checked in Novotel Hotel in Dakar where I checked in. I received a warm welcome staff members. Tired after long hours of travelling, a nap was very much needed before anything else. The view from the hotel room was magnificent with a swimming pool and beach nearside.

 

By the time I woke up, it was already late at about 21:00 hrs, I went to Radisson blu and met Kevin Chege and other delegates at the Gala Dinner. The atmosphere was friendly, welcoming and promising.

Tunnelix.com is constantly retweeting the #AISdakar. It can be viewed here:

 

 

 Next article coming up soon..

IETF 101 Hackathon by the Hackers.mu team

We believe in rough consensus and running code” – Just have a look at the IETF website, this is the motto that you would come across. This is why the IETF hackathons are so special during the year and hackers.mu team is proud to be the first team in Mauritius who does not only participate in such type of event but also lead the TLS working group. The IETF 101 hackathon was yet another challenge for the hackers.mu team. But, once you are in, the fun begins. Compared to the IETF 100 hackathon, hackers.mu team made an improvement in terms of lines of codes and focused on more projects. We participated remotely in projects such as TLS 1.3, DNS, and HTTP 451. A wiki was also created during that event.

Photo credits: IETF.org
Photo credits: IETF.org

We used Jabber to communicate for the IETF 101 hackathon. Other media such as Facebook was found out to be interesting. I should admit that on Friday and Saturday I went to sleep at 02.00 AM with just the testing part completed. At 23:00 hrs, Logan was asking everyone to go to sleep as we needed more energy on the next day. Selven was also working hard remotely to bring all members on track. What is more relieving is the team spirit where everyone was helping each other during that hackathon.

Photo Credits: Codarren.com
Photo Credits: Codarren.com

One of the interesting issues noticed is about TLS malformed traffic and such thing was able to be detected using Wireshark. Once the patches were ready and the testing part was working fine, we made a debrief at Flying Dodo beer brewing company at Bagatelle Mall and was ready submit patches to their respective projects. I was assigned the “Stunnel” project and a library in “Eclipse Paho”.

Debriefing at Flying Dodo accompanied with beer and some fries
Debriefing at Flying Dodo accompanied with beer and some fries

After the debriefing, Logan was getting ready for his remote presentation at the IETF. We all went through the slides that logan created and went back home happily to see the presentation live on YouTube.

Special thanks goes to the IETF Organising team for having us as Technology Champions! Nick Sullivan head of cryptography expert at CloudFlare, Charkes Eckel, Barry Leiba, Meetecho team, Cisco for sponsoring the event and the all members of the hackers.mu team which made this hackathon a success in the world history of Mauritius.

Other’s are also talking about the IETF 101 hackathon ?

“I had initially started a bit slow, as I was working on other projects in parallel. Everyone was already deeply immersed in their projects, we could see PRs and code merges flying right from the first day.”Codarren Velvindron

“It seems that I am not the only one who feels that this hackathon was really addictive. we were hooked the moment we started working out on our tasks.”Pirabarlen Cheenaramen

Developers working with OpenSSL can finally start to work with TLS 1.3, thanks to the alpha version of OpenSSL 1.1.1 that landed yesterday.” – TheRegister

I think that you guys have more better weather and more fun that we did”Charles Eckel

The DNS madness: 185 RFCs totaling 2781 pages. Hello DNS security flaws ” – Loganaden Velvindron

hackers.mu pioneering the internet! We made it to IETF 101 hackathon with our team members getting featured in front of thousands, followed by a round of applause by IETF members in London. Congratulations guys, we did it again!”Yasir Auleear 

IETF Hackathons encourage developers to collaborate and develop utilities, ideas, sample code and solutions that show practical implementations of IETF standards. The IETF Hackathon in London on 17-18 March is poised to be the largest ever.” – IETF

 In case you are asking yourself, “who are the hackers.mu ?” You can consider is as “a group of developers from Mauritius who loves to code and are passionate about information security.” More information at https://www.hackers.mu

IT and Internet Users of Dodoland by hackers.mu

Since the split of the Linux community in Mauritius, hackers.mu was born. A new vision and objectives were the foundation of the hackers.mu core group. Our aim is to reach more people who will code in softwares that are used worldwide. The hackers.mu family kept growing. Today, we have brought more members in the hackers.mu community and right now, there is a boom in this group. Additionally, people from various part of the world wants to be part of the group, as seen on our Facebook group. Hackers.mu has been hosting live video streams on YouTube to bring together more people willing to learn and share in the community.

Just chill. Let me get back to the title of this blog – IT and Internet Users of Dodoland! On Saturday, the 18th of November 2017, I was at the University of Mauritius together with Logan. We were joined by Yash Paupiah and Jagveer Loky. A presentation was carried out on “Introduction to Github” and the launch of the Mailing List called the “IT and Internet Users of Dodoland”. During the presentation, Logan brushed over the importance of having a Github account as well as sharing one’s code on it.

Presentation by Logan at the University of Mauritius

An example is to publish one’s assignment by a student. This acts as a catalyst for the academic development of the student. Today, companies will usually search the Github account of people, including Mauritians before recruiting them. Students were encouraged to create their Github accounts and even a blog. Then, we discussed about the achievement in the IETF 100 Hackathon. Logan took an example of Yash Paupiah’s who did some scripting two years back and now sending patch in the open source community. For example, the patches about TLS 1.3 during the IETF 100 Hackathon. At the end of the session, we announced the creation of the Mailing List “IT and Internet Users of Dodoland”. Jagveer Loky from the hackers.mu community was chosen to be the moderator of the mailing list. He will ensure the proper and smooth running of the mailing list.

At the University of Mauritius

At the end of the presentation, we had conversations with the students who were interested in topics such as OpenSSH, MVC, Java Programming, and MongoDB. Notes were taken to focus on these topics in the days to come. Then, we headed to Flying Dodo Bagatelle to celebrate the launch of the new mailing list by the hackers.mu team.

Celebrating with beer and pizza at Flying Dodo Bagatelle

We also had a video stream, where we were joined by other people from the hackers.mu community who came forward asking questions about the IETF 100 Hackathon and on several aspects of TLS1.3. Jagveer shoot a question as to whether people knew about the IETF in Mauritius. Of course, many knows about the IETF, but at what level is the contribution? As a technical guy, merely watching what’s going on at an IETF Hackathon does not make sense but instead contributions should be carried out in terms of codes to make the OpenSource community more rigid. 

Video Stream from Yesternight

At hackers.mu, we kept on innovating to transmit the messages through the internet as well as on the ground. Weeks back, we were also at the University of Mauritius where we met Yashtir Gopee who is a passionate of robotics and Artificial Intelligence. He also joined the hackers.mu community and is willing to join the “IT and Internet Users of Dodoland” Mailing List.

Yashtir and Logan

Indeed, we have come a long way since the creation of hackers.mu. In such short time, we have been able to meet our objectives and we are continuing towards innovations and quality work in the group. I am looking forward that people make good use of the Mailing List and bring forward their issues as well as their contributions. Click to join the Mailing list.