Tag: security

Phishing Attack – Free Travel tickets with Emirates Airline

Today itself, a friend sent me a message about free travel ticket with Emirates airline through WhatsApp. On seeing the URL, I immediately doubt about the authenticity of such kind of strategy spammers are using to make money as well as to harvest data about you. Once you fill in the form, it will prompt you to share the information to 30 people on WhatsApp to get your ticket. Common, this does not make sense at all and I believe that the website should be reported and Emirates Airline to make an official announcement on its website about these scammers.


Photo Credits: Emirates.com

The message sent to me was in French. Since I’m well conversant in French, I could easily read and interpreted it. The message received is as follows:


“Pour le 33° Anniversaire, la compagnie aérienne *Emirates Airline* donne à tout le monde *2 billets d´avion gratuits*. Récupérez votre billets d´avion immédiatement. http://bit.ly/Emirates-airline”

The translation looks like this in English:

“For the 33rd Birthday, the aviation airline “Emirates Airline” is giving a free *2 air travel tickets. Get your airline tickets immediately. http://bit.ly/Emirates-airline”

If you observed carefully the real URL has been shortened on bit.ly. There is nothing wrong when using bit.ly which is a great tool for URL shortener. However, if you try to access the URL, you will be redirected on http://5ack.com/Emirate/ which is well known for attacks.

Let’s see what does the whois tool said about 5ack.com:

1.According to domaintools.com, the IP Address behind is 107.180.59.131 

2. The IP Address 107.180.59.131 is well known for attacks and there is no real information as to who is behind this domain name.

3. Worst, the domain 5ack.com has a history of 55 counts of changed IP addresses.

Extract from domaintools.com

4. On the following link https://chat.stackexchange.com/transcript/65945/2018/11/14/2 we can see someone has blacklisted the IP 107.180.59.131 who at that time was selling health supplement. Of course, it’s fake again.

Please don’t click on the link otherwise you might eat those baits and be a victim of Phishing attacks. I wonder how come those links ended in Mauritius which is probably due to French-speaking people here in Mauritius. Otherwise, several French-speaking countries in Africa is at risk. I wish someone from the security team of Emirates Airline read that blog and made an official announcement soon about those spammers hovering everywhere on the Internet. Let’s work together for a safe and secure Internet and keep on passing the message.

Operation KSK-ROLL by cyberstorm.mu – KSK Rollover Explained

The last cyberstorm.mu event was on OpenSource licensing with Dr. Till Jaeger at Flying Dodo, Bagatelle Mall Mauritius. We discussed several issues concerning cybersecurity laws, trademarks, OpenSource licensing issues etc.. Dr. Till Jaeger appreciated the meetup and encouraged us to evangelize more on OpenSource. The event was organized by Loganaden Velvindron member of cyberstorm.mu.

Dr. Till Jaeger and logan with a surprise gift.
Dr. Till Jaeger brought a surprise gift to Logan 🙂

I should say that we were already planning about our next event, hence, a hackathon on Operation KSK-ROLL by the cyberstorm.mu team which was pretty easy, important and successful. Dr. Till Jaeger congratulate us for creating the cyberstorm.mu team. Several pull requests sent to many repositories to encourage developers to adopt the new key.

What is Operation KSK-ROLL?

At cyberstorm.mu all Non-IETF hackathons are usually given a name. This time for the KSK rollover hackathon we have chosen 'Operation KSK-Roll'. Operation KSK-ROLL has been started to make sure that software is up-to-date with the new KSK key.

What is the KSK rollover?

The DNS KSK Rollover happened on 11 October at 11:00 UTC. Rolling the KSK means generating a new key cryptographic key pair (public and private key).

What are those keys?

The public key is distributed to those who operate valid DNS resolvers such as ISPs, network administrators, system integrators etc.. whilst, the private key is kept secret.

If its secret, why do we need to generate another secret key?

For security purpose, the secret key is generated anew and this ensures that DNS resolvers have a more robust security layer on top of the DNS AKA: DNSSEC

What are DNS resolvers?

All websites, example tunnelix.com which is a domain name is behind an IP Address. For your browser to be able to resolve the website, a DNS resolver which is located at several parts of the world will identify the IP with the domain name. Consequently, this will render the website on your browser.

What is DNSSEC?

As mentioned previously, DNSSEC (DNS Security) is a layer added by ICANN to ensure by means of cryptographic keys to ensure an online protection from the provider of the root domain name to your browser.

How will you know if a website is DNSSEC signed?

There is a tool by VeriSign lab which provides DNSSEC Analyzer. You can enter the name of the domain, say tunnelix.com which will analyze the domain show you the public key and the chain from the . (dot),  com and tunnelix.com.

credits to: verisignlabs.com
credits to: verisignlabs.com

Is there another way to verify it?

Yes, you can use the nslookup or dig tool to check it. In the case of the dig tool here is a screenshot.

What is the logic behind the DIG command?

Some years back (the Year 2015), I explained the anatomy of the dig command. You can view more details about the blog post called "Anatomy of a simple dig result".


What is the role of the KSK?

The KSK private key is used to generate a digital signature for the ZSK. In fact, the KSK public key is stored in the DNS to be used for authenticating the ZSK. So, the KSK is a key to sign another key for the ZSK. That is why it is called the "Key Signing Key".

So, what is the ZSK?

The ZSK (Zone Signing Key) is another private-public key pair which is used to generate a digital signature known as RRSIG ( Resource Record Signature). The RRSIG in itself is a digital signature for each RRSET (Resource Record Sets) in a zone. In fact, the ZSK is stored in the domain name system to authenticate the RRset.

What are RRsets?

RRsets (Resource Record sets) is a group of records DNS Record Set (RRsets) with the same record type, for example, all DNS A records are one RRset.

My contributions for KSK ROLL

Please follow me on my Github account. One of the repositories is Nagval which is a plugin to check the validity of one of more DNSSEC domains.

For more information about DNSSEC, ZSK, PSK etc, I would advise to check out Cloudflare which provided a good source of information.

Cyberstorm.mu continue to go beyond and further with innovations and more ideas to protect and secure the Internet. We believe that though we are a small team will be able to recruit more people who are strongly interested in developing their skills to strive for excellence.

I also wish to seize this opportunity to thanks Manuv Panchoo for designing the logo of  tunnelix.com


All rights reserved: tunnelix.com
All rights reserved: tunnelix.com

cyberstorm.mu meetup on OpenSource Licensing with Dr Till Jaeger

It was a great opportunity to meet with Dr. Till Jaeger, Attorney at Law on cybersecurity, laws, trademarks and opensource licensing on Tuesday the 02nd of October 2018 at Flying Dodo, Bagatelle Mall. The event was announced on the official cyberstorm.mu community Facebook group by Logan days back. Those present for the meetup was Loganaden Velvindron, Jagveer Loky, Rahul Golam, Kifah Meeran, Veegish Ramdani, Muzaffar Auhammud, Jeremie Daniel and myself from the cyberstorm.mu team.

Who is Dr. Till Jaeger? – Till Jaeger has been a partner at JBB Rechtsanwälte since 2001. He advises large and medium-sized IT businesses as well as government authorities and software developers on matters involving contracts, licensing and online use. Till Jaeger also covers conventional areas of copyright law and entertainment law, advising corporate clients on matters relating to open content, web design and photography. – Source: JBB.DE

Some pictures during the informal event:

 

OpenSource licensing with Dr. Till Jaeger and cyberstorm.mu

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Screen Shot 2018-10-07 at 6.59.57 PM
Screen Shot 2018-10-07 at 7.00.09 PM
Screen Shot 2018-10-07 at 6.59.25 PM
Screen Shot 2018-10-07 at 6.59.25 PM

I should admit that it was really an informal meeting over some beers, juice, Dame-Blanche, and Pizzas with Dr. Till Jaeger. It was very fruitful and amazing to the team. We received lots of advice for ourselves as well as for the cyberstorm.mu team. Some days back, the National Computer Board conducted a workshop on Opensource licensing which where Dr. Till Jaeger was the main resource person to deliver this workshop. Thanks to the National Computer Board for making this event a success. Cyberstorm.mu members were also invited to the event.

We have also welcomed Rahul Golam for joining cyberstorm.mu team and looking forward to work together. I seized this opportunity to announce that cyberstorm.mu  is proud to announce it’s official logo. Thanks to the hard work of the team.


Photo Credits: cyberstorm.mu
Photo Credits: cyberstorm.mu

Photo Credits: cyberstorm.mu
Photo Credits: cyberstorm.mu

IETF 102 hackathon remotely from Mauritius

The hackers.mu team has been participating in several IETF hackathons these recent years. For the IETF 102 hackathon, we focused tremendously on innovation: The goal to create two teams for the TLS 1.3 project, one for the Implementation team and the other is Interop. At the same time, getting hands on the HTTP 451 project. The IETF hackathon encourages developers to collaborate and develop utilities, ideas, sample code and solutions that show practical implementations of IETF standards. It is not a competition but a collaborative event.

For this IETF hackathon, myself and Loganaden Velvindron core members of hackers.mu team decided to lead the event. We searched a marvelous venue at Pointe aux Piments, a remote coastal area in the north-west of Mauritius which was very peaceful and can accommodate the whole team including first-timers of the IETF hackathon for three nights. As regards food, the best place is at Triolet, a village nearby which is famous for street foods including Pizza, Indian food, Grilled, Burgers and Brianis. We also chose that venue as it included a WiFi hotspot, several rooms, bathrooms and even a swimming pool.

The participants from the hackers.mu team was: Loganaden Velvindron, Rahul Golam, Kifah Sheik Meeran, Nigel Yong Sao Young Steven Ken Fouk, Muzaffar Auhammud, Codarren Velvindron, Yasir Aulear and myself – Nitin J Mutkawoa. As regards to the first-timers were: Veegish Ramdani, Jeremie Daniel, Jagveer Loky, Nathan Sunil Mangar and Avishai Poorun.

On day 1, we all set up our lab environments and since most first-timers were in the TLS 1.3 Interoperability team, a plan was already designed. We knew since the beginning that there would be the logistic issues, so we brought spare laptops, screens, memory card, projector etc.. Logan explained the situation we had to deal with especially when it comes to interoperability to the first-timers. Then, they assigned themselves some tasks. At first, it was time-consuming to get started, but at the end of day1, I can feel how everyone was working as a team and looking in the same direction for the TLS 1.3. On the other hand, Veegish was getting hands-on HTTP 451. Whilst the Interoperability team was having fun, the implementation team, on the other hand, was yet another challenge: Improving source code for TLS 1.3 compat layer.

On day 2, everyone woke up early and went for a morning walk. Afterward, the team was back to coding and debugging. Whilst some were on the implementation and Interoperability tasks, Veegish already advanced on the HTTP 451 project. A debrief carried out by logan to understand where the team stands. We had to constantly evaluate ourselves so that we knew in which direction we are moving. At the end of the day, most of us were already in the pool for some chilling moments. I seized the opportunity to make a Time Lapse video with my iPhone 7+ 🙂

On day 3, the atmosphere was intense. The implementation team needs to make sure the code has been tested and it is running correctly. I was heavily involved in the PHP CURL library part. The testing part was very challenging. At some moment I was so tired and hopeless as the testing part was really complex. At the same time, others were trying to help each other. Kifah was also on some bash scripting for the interoperability part. He wanted to automate some tasks. Logan was also looking at his code and helping the others. Well, at the end of the day we were so happy to be able to accomplish what we had planned. Everyone looked so tired. The only option is to go back to the pool.

We also decided to make some mini videoS to relate our experience during the hackathon. I uploaded the videos on YouTube. You can view it from the playlist below:

On day 4, we packed up to our destination. At that very moment in Montreal, the hackathon was still going on. I reached home at about 19:00 hrs Mauritius time. I was assigned a three minutes presentation for the hackathon carried out by the Mauritius team. It was already midnight. I was so tired. I knew that the presentation had to be carried out. Logan was constantly texting me to make sure that I did not fall asleep. You can view the presentation remotely live in Montreal Canada.

What did IETF hackers say about the IETF 102 hackathon?

“What I think was the most productive output during this time for me was pair-programming…” – Kifah

“I was very excited to be part of the Inter-operability team where I worked with OpenSSL, BoringSSL, WolfSSL, and tlslite using TLS1.3 protocols.” – Jagveer

“Making Internet Protocols great again during the IETF 102 hackathon” – Logan

“Finally after long hours of debugging he managed to test the protocol being used by NRPE locally” – Rahul

“Then… we finally got a Client Hello from Wireshark and made the PR” – Nigel

“At first I thought that it would only be working, working and working but besides of work we started creating bonds.” – Jeremie

“I got a lot of advice, support, and motivation to work with my team members and try to implement on a strategic basis and critical thinking the internet protocols and see their limit on a technical perspective.” – Avishai

“Once OpenSSL was installed, I then performed my first TLS 1.3 Handshake, Resumption, and 0-RTT but did run into difficulties with NSS.” – Chromico

“But while everyone is waiting, we are working. We have reached a deeper understanding of how it will affect our lives.” – Codarren

“IETF 102 was very fun and challenging experience in which I got to work on several opensource projects” – Muzaffar

“At first, I did encounter some issues like parsing JSON files, but I manage to work on those issues” – Veegish

We also had a follower on Twitter appreciating our effort and participation during the IETF 102 hackathon. Thanks, Dan York, senior manager at ISOC.

I’m happy that this hackathon was at the required level. It was a great initiative from the hackers.mu team. No major incidents occurred in our HQ at Pointe aux Piments. Everything that was planned went all and it’s worth investing yourself in this collaborative event.

Operation JASK – Just a Single Keystroke

Apart from the IETF hackathons, the hackers.mu team also focused on internal hackathon either remotely or on-site participation. Another remote hackathon was already in progress since Saturday the 16th of June 2018. It was named Operation JASK – Just a Single Keystroke. Announced publicly on Sunday the 17th of June 2018 after noticing that several Crypto currency mining tools were vulnerable to CVE-2018-12356. By the time, many members of the team were already mobilised even if it was a public holiday in Mauritius. The operation was named JASK – Just a Single Keystroke as the security issues is concerned with the hardening of a regular expression, in particular requiring [GNUPG:] to be at the beginning of a line (^\[GNUPG:\]). We had to fire a single keystroke at the right place to fix a single vulnerability.

Marcus Brinkmann, who is a free software activist explained “An issue was discovered in password-store.sh in pass in Simple Password Store 1.7 through 1.7.1. The signature verification routine parses the output of GnuPG with an incomplete regular expression, which allows remote attackers to spoof file signatures on configuration files and extensions scripts. Modifying the configuration file allows the attacker to inject additional encryption keys under their control, thereby disclosing passwords to the attacker. Modifying the extension scripts allows the attacker arbitrary code execution.” 

However, simple the patch is, the attack aimed GnuPG signature verification process which is specific to pass the Simple Password Store. It can give the attacker access to passwords and remote code execution. On theRegister.co.uk – Pass gets a fail: Simple Password Store suffers GnuPG spoofing bug, Loganaden Velvindron core member of the hackers.mu explained “It’s hard to identify just how many downstream projects inherit a vulnerability like the one Brinkmann spotted, but the number of problem projects will likely be non-trivial because the GnuPG cryptography suite has applications beyond e-mail protection.”

The hackers.mu usual suspects during Operation JASK hackathon are: Kifah Meeran, Loganaden Velvindron, Rahul Golam, Muzaffar Auhammud, Nigel Yong and myself (Nitin J Mutkawoa) all members from the hackers.mu. Some of the projects are Bitcoin, Litecoin, Dash, Bitcoin Gold, Monacoin, Binarium, Terracoin, SmartCash and many other crypto currency projects.

Hackers.mu is now looking forward for other hackathons. We are also inviting everyone to meet us at Flying Dodo Bagatelle conference room for the Security Disclosure Process event. Feel free to RSVP on meetup.com  and Facebook before attending.